Dogs of Baseball: Meet the Very Good Boys Coming to a Ballpark Near You

By: Sara VentieraUpdated:

baseball dogs
Chewy Studios

Dogs of Baseball: Meet the Very Good Boys Coming to a Ballpark Near You

Have you heard about bat dogs? They’re the canine version of a baseball bat boy, aka the person who fetches the bats after successful hits—and if you live near one of the many cities across the country with a Minor League Baseball (MiLB) team, there may be a bat dog returning to a field near you this April.

In 1990, a MiLB promoter spotted a dog named Jericho delivering money and purchases to customers at a drive-through farm store in rural Ohio. Inspiration struck, and the promoter asked the dog’s parent if Jericho would be interested in delivering water bottles to umpires at baseball games. Before long, Jake the Diamond Dog was traveling to ballparks around the country to serve as honorary bat dog, delighting players, umpires and fans alike. The tradition continued until 2018, with three additional dogs taking on Jake’s title over the years. Jake’s example proved that dogs and baseball go together like peanuts and Cracker Jack.

Today, several MiLB teams have added baseball dogs to their own rosters. Some come from a family lineage of bat dogs that dates back generations. Others, like Jake, show an aptitude and get trained specifically for the job, sometimes by the team staff itself. One of this year’s bat dogs even had a previous career as a guide dog-in-training!

But no matter how they got on the field, one thing is clear: These pups do more than fetch bats. They also serve as unofficial mascots for the teams during home games, greeting spectators and sometimes entertaining fans alongside the action on the field. With baseball season returning this month, we’re marking the occasion by taking an inside-the-dugout look at the league’s cutest teammates: baseball dogs.

baseball dogs
Photo courtesy of Fred Hassen

1Finn the Bat Dog


Team: Las Vegas Aviators

City: Las Vegas, Nevada
Of all the baseball dogs in the Minor Leagues, Finn the Bat Dog of the Las Vegas Aviators might just be the most famous. The 8-year-old black Lab went viral in 2019 when he tried to do his job—fetching a bat—but was beaten to the task by a frustrated umpire who threw the bat to the sidelines first. The deafening boos from the stands (intended for the ump, of course) were resounding, but Finn just kept wagging his tail and retrieved the bat from where it landed.

Finn, who lives with professional dog trainer Fred Hassen, started picking up bats for the Aviators back in 2016 or 2017. The happy dog excelled in spite of all of the distractions in the stadium: the loud crowds, the umpires, the players coming and going, and balls. Lots of balls.

“I was nervous at first,” Hassen says. “But after two or three games, I realized we could do this in our sleep.”

Finn quickly stepped up from retrieving bats to performing agility tricks like jumping over chairs and fences, taking a seat on a portable fire hydrant on command, and even waiting at home plate for the batter to cross after hitting a home run. “Before long the players started doing all kinds of stuff with Finn when they’d cross home plate,” says Hassen, including high-fives, a good scratch behind the ears, and more.

The animated pup became such a beloved member of the team that when the Aviators moved to a new stadium in 2019, Finn got his own parking spot as well as a clubhouse with a TV and shower to cool down between innings. This upcoming season he will be getting a new assistant on the field when his sister Lambo, a chocolate Lab, joins the team.

“I think fans and players appreciate the skill level of what he’s doing,” Hassen says. “He does it so happily, and it's entertaining. People are always saying, ‘Everyone should have an attitude like that dog.’”

baseball dogs
Photo courtesy of the Trenton Thunder

2Rookie


Team: Trenton Thunder

City: Trenton, New Jersey

When it comes to fetching bats, the Trenton Thunder’s Rookie is a born natural—perhaps because he comes from a proud line of bat dogs. That’s right: Rookie is a third-generation baseball dog. He’s the grandson of the Thunder’s very first bat dog, a Golden Retriever named Chase (full name: Chase That Golden Thunder), who debuted with the team in 2002. Chase has since passed, but his legacy lives on in his grandson Rookie, says Eric Lipsman, senior vice president of corporate sales and sponsorships for the team.

Rookie started entertaining spectators in the summer of 2014, watching the games and meeting fans while his dad Derby was still the main bat dog. The next summer, he was tasked with retrieving his first bat—but Rookie, who was just 2 years old at the time, struck out. “He just ran out into the outfield,” Lipsman recalls, laughing. “He just wasn’t ready.”

But Rookie wasn’t deterred. He kept training and practicing, and the following summer his bat dog skills were “absolute perfection,” Lipsman says. “He’s been perfection ever since.”

The friendly, well-mannered pup has many responsibilities during games. He fetches bats in the first couple of innings. Around the sixth, Rookie brings a basket of water to the umpires. He also hosts meet-and-greets with fans.

This year, Rookie will add one more task to the list: furthering his family baseball legacy. His cousin on his mother’s side, Dash, will start attending games and training alongside Rookie. With Rookie’s warm personality and prestigious pedigree, Dash will certainly be learning the ropes from one of the best.

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baseball dogs
Photo courtesy of the Frisco Roughriders

3Brooks


Team: Frisco Roughriders

City: Frisco, Texas

Breed: Golden Retriever-Labrador Retriever mix

As bat dog duties go, the Frisco Roughriders’ Golden Retriever-Lab mix Brooks might just have the cutest one. His signature move is leading a group of children in a victory lap around the bases after every team win. In fact, he’s so good at his routine that he’s able to time his runs perfectly, so that he and his young fans touch home plate just as the fireworks go off.

Brooks is a 7-year-old guide dog dropout. (He had to change careers because he spills water all over the floor when he drinks.) But he’s found his calling as a baseball dog, beloved by fans of all ages, many of whom come to games to meet and take photos with the dog. In fact, says the Roughrider’s chief operating officer, Scott Burchett, the team’s most-liked social media posts are always related to Brooks.

This extremely “chill” pup, as Burchett describes him, has a different title from many other baseball dogs. Brooks is officially known as the team’s “Chief Morale Officer.” Burchett says the greatest of all his skills is keeping the mood up for everyone in the stadium, especially the staffers.

“If you need a break from the stress of the day, you just grab Brooks and go for a walk through the ballpark,” Burchett explains. “It gives you perspective and puts a smile on your face.”

baseball dogs
Photo courtesy of the Burlington Bees

4Ozzie


Team: Burlington Bees

City: Burlington, Iowa

Breed: Shetland Sheepdog

Not all baseball dogs perform tricks on the field. Some, like 1-year-old Sheltie Ozzie, are better suited to helping out behind the scenes.

Ozzie joined the Burlington Bees as a 12-week-old pup on January 13, 2020, just a couple of months before the team suspended activities due to COVID-19. His official title is Director of Fur and Kanine Relations, but throughout the pandemic, Ozzie quickly became a one-dog pep squad.

“He’s kind of been like our therapy dog,” says general manager Kim Parker. “He brings up the morale for sure.”

A typical day for Ozzie starts when Parker picks him up from his home at her parents’ house. (Kim’s father, former Bees’ General Manager Chuck Brockett, is Ozzie’s pet parent.) When they get to the office, Ozzie plays with the staff for a bit, often running around inside or baiting a coworker into a game of chase on the field—both of which make for great Instagram content.

Around 10 a.m., he takes an hour-long nap, then not-so-patiently waits for lunch, Parker says.

Anytime you have dogs at the ballpark, you have more fun.
— Kim Parker, Burlington Bees General Manager
Ozzie’s daily tasks vary from day to day and may include assisting with filling merchandise orders, playing fetch with an empty two-liter water bottle, herding staff to the door, greeting visitors, and most importantly, cuddling.
When the frisky puppy finally gets a chance to greet fans in person this season, the Bees expect him to boost their spectators’ spirits as much as he lifts their own. “Anytime you have dogs at the ballpark, you have more fun,” Parker says.
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Baseball Dogs Near You

Ozzie, Brooks, Rookie and Finn are just a few of the bat dogs who’ll be taking the field this year. If you’d like to see or even meet a baseball dog in person, why not contact your nearest Minor League Baseball team and ask if they have any dogs on the roster? With 120 teams across the United States and Canada, there’s likely to be a club near you.

The diamond and dugout aren’t the only places you can find dogs at the ballpark, either. Many teams, in both the Minor and Major Leagues, host special “bark at the park” nights when fans can bring their well-behaved pups to watch the game. Search your local team’s calendar for upcoming dog-friendly events to share the baseball experience with your pet. Think of it as teaching your dog a whole new meaning to the phrase, “play ball!”

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By: Sara VentieraUpdated:

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