English Springer Spaniel

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Get all the information you need to know about the English Springer Spaniel dog to see if this pup's a good match for you.

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
12 to 14 years
Size:

Medium

Maintenance Level:

High

Shed Level:

Medium

Temperament:
Star AthleteLoyal SidekickPeople-Pleaser
Coat Color:
BlackLiverBlue RoanLiver RoanTri-colorBlack And WhiteLiver And White

Best For

English Springer Spaniels are best for active pup parents who will be home for most of the day. Springers need a home with a large fenced yard to run around in. And happily, these playful pups make great play buddies for older kids.

English Springer Spaniel Traits

What makes the English Springer Spaniel an English Springer Spaniel? Let's find out how they stack up.

English Springer Spaniel Temperament

The English Springer Spaniel’s temperament is high-spirited and gregarious. They are very driven dogs. Bred to be out in the fields hunting with people, their philosophy is “the more, the merrier.” Springers love to please their people, which makes them very trainable.

Since they love their people so much, they need a home where someone will be with them for most of the day. (The separation anxiety is real.) If you’re not able to be with them, check them into doggy daycare or arrange for a neighbor or pet sitter to come by for playtime.

Speaking of playtime, Springer Spaniel dogs are very playful, making them great with older kids as long as they are properly socialized from an early age. These pups are very active and may knock over toddlers and babies during play (so be sure to supervise play times!). Their super friendly nature extends to other dogs, but not to cats. (They were born to hunt and will give chase. )

These dogs are very intelligent and have an independent streak, so training needs to start early and be consistent. Their intelligence and independence make them better suited to someone who has experience with dogs, but they can be good for a new pup parent who is willing to commit to the necessary training. (Say goodbye to Saturdays off!)

These pups have a lot of energy and need both mental and physical stimulation. Always remember that a tired Springer is a well-mannered Springer. And if your pup isn’t getting the exercise and attention they need, they may resort to coming up with their own entertainment, and that’ll include chewing your shoes and digging in your yard.

How to Care for a English Springer Spaniel

The English Springer Spaniel dog is a gorgeous but rather high-maintenance dog. Their double coats need to be tended to several times a week to keep them dog-show ready. And with their abundance of energy and smarts, you will need to spend lots of time every day training and exercising them. But, hey—that’s just more time to bond with this loveable dog.

English Springer Spaniel Health

English Springer Spaniels have a lifespan of 12 to 14 years, although they are prone to a number of health problems. Some of these health issues may be avoided by working with a breeder who screens their puppies and parents. Armed with knowledge and the advice of your vet, you can help your pup live the longest life possible.

  • Elbow and Hip Dysplasia: These are developmental disorders where the elbow or hip joint is malformed. Over time, it results in wearing of the bone and osteoarthritis of the joint and is painful for your pup. Depending on the severity, treatments include medications, weight control or surgery.
  • Canine Phosphofructokinase (PFK) Deficiency: This is a genetic disease that prevents the dog from transforming glucose into energy and causes exercise intolerance, muscle disease and eventually anemia. There is no cure for PFK, but it can be managed with blood transfusions as needed.
  • Ear Infections: Often caused by allergies as well as water trapped in the ear from swimming or bathing, ear infections cause itching and inflammation. Your vet can prescribe medicated drops to resolve the infection. You can help prevent ear infections by keeping your pup’s ears dry.
  • Retinal Dysplasia: Also known as progressive retinal atrophy, retinal dysplasia is a degenerative disease that affects the photoreceptors of the eye, leading to gradual blindness. There is no cure for the condition, but a dog with retinal dysplasia can adjust to vision loss and still lead a happy life.
  • Rage Syndrome: This is a rare disorder seen in a few dog breeds, like the Cocker Spaniel and the Springer Spaniel. Some experts think it may be tied to epilepsy. A dog suddenly gets very aggressive for seemingly no reason, then
    immediately calms down. This is an extremely rare condition, and if you
    think your pup suffers from it, get with your vet for an evaluation and
    diagnosis.

English Springer Spaniel History

It’s likely the English Springer Spaniel finds their origins in Spain, but they’re mainly known as descendants of the English Spaniels of Norfolk or Shropshire in the mid-19th century. These hunting dogs accompanied hunters and flushed (or sprung) birds from the brush, earmarking them as “Springers.” Once upon a time, the English Cocker Spaniel and the English Springer Spaniel were the same breed. Larger pups of a litter were used as “springers,” and smaller pups were used for hunting woodcocks.

In 1902, Springer Spaniels were divided into two distinct breeds, the English Springer Spaniel and the Welsh Springer Spaniel, by the English Kennel Club. The American Kennel Club recognized the English Springer Spaniel in 1910, and today, the pup ranks No. 27 on the AKC’s popularity list.

Want to add an English Springer Spaniel to your family? You can find a list of reputable breeders on the AKC website. The average price for a puppy is between $800 and $2,000. But for that price, you’re likely getting a pup who’s been screened for health and temperament issues and may come with pedigree papers. If you’d like to adopt a pup, contact an English Springer Spaniel rescue or keep an eye out for the breed at your local animal shelter.

FAQs

What is the difference between a Springer Spaniel and a Cocker Spaniel?

Springer Spaniels and Cocker Spaniels are two different breeds—today. Centuries ago, the breeds were the same but used for different jobs. The Springers were the larger pups of the litter and used to spring (flush) birds from the brush, and the Cockers were the smaller pups and used to hunt woodcocks.

Do English Springer Spaniels shed?

Yes, English Springer Spaniels shed a lot. They shed moderately throughout the year, but during the fall and spring, they kick into high gear. Be sure you’ve got an industrial-strength vacuum for shedding season.

Are Springer Spaniels good family dogs?

Springer Spaniels are good family dogs! They love their people and make wonderful family pets. When raised together, kids and Springers are perfect companions for romping, running and shenanigans. Can you picture anything cuter?

When do Springer Spaniels stop growing?

Springer Spaniels stop growing around 18 to 20 months old when they reach their maturity.

What are the most popular English Springer Spaniel names?

The most popular English Springer Spaniel names include Beau, Candy, Holly, Baby, Sadie, Duchess, Ginger, Jake, Duke, Cleo, Sammy, Abby, Pepper and Mara. Find more inspo for your dog’s name here.

What are the most common Springer Spaniel mixes?

The most common Springer Spaniel mixes are:

  • English Springer Spaniel-Poodle mix (Sproodle, Springerdoodle Retriever, Springerpoo, Springerpoo Retriever)
  • English Springer Spaniel–Labrador mix (Springador)
  • English Springer Spaniel–Border Collie mix (Sprollies)
  • English Springer Spaniel–Golden Retriever mix (Spangold Retriever)
  • English Springer Spaniel–Cocker Spaniel mix(Sprocker Spaniel)
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Top Takeaways

The active, outdoorsy traits of the English Springer Spaniel make this pup the perfect pet for the active, outdoorsy type. They are a loving, rambunctious and intelligent breed who will win you over with their playful personalities. But heaven help you if you leave them alone for hours on end—they do not enjoy time for quiet reflection! They need a confident pup parent to manage their energy and intelligence; as long as you’re willing to make that commitment, they’ll be good for first-time pup parents.

Expert input provided by Sarah Wooten, DVM at Pumpkin, and Alex Smith, a trainer at the Positive Puppy Trainer.

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