What Vegetables Can Dogs Eat and How to Prepare Them

By: Chewy EditorialUpdated:

Vegetables for Dogs
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What Vegetables Can Dogs Eat and How to Prepare Them

If you’re looking for healthy treats to add to your dog’s diet, try vegetables for dogs. Not only are vegetables a good source of vitamins and minerals that provide health benefits, but non-starchy dog-friendly vegetables are also low in calories and fat. Wondering what vegetables can dogs eat? Well, listen up!

With the help of some experts, we found the best vegetables for dogs. From carrots to zucchini, these veggies for dogs are healthy and delicious! And to help you out in the kitchen, we also learned how to prepare vegetables for dogs.

Can dogs eat raw vegetables? Yes! But there are many other ways to prep veggies for dogs. You can cook, steam, bake, roast, grill or puree these dog-friendly vegetables. But no matter how you prepare vegetables for dogs, avoid using salt! Dogs don’t always care for it and, even on the best vegetables for dogs, it is not good them.

Read below to see what vegetables can dogs eat and how to prepare vegetables for dogs, with suggested portion sizes for treats. Bon appetit!

Asparagus

  • High in vitamins and essential minerals and nutrients
  • Zero fat, high in fiber
  • Be sure to remove tough ends before serving and cook until tender
  • Serving is one or two cooked spears
  • Preparation: Remove the fibrous ends from the asparagus spears and wash them thoroughly. Toss them with olive oil and grill 30 to 60 seconds on all sides.
  • Dog treat portion size: Cut into bite-size pieces. Feed one to two pieces.
  • Benefits: This vegetable dogs can eat is a good source of vitamins A, B1, B2, E and K, folate, iron copper, fiber, manganese and potassium. It also contains vitamin C, an immune-system booster.

Broccoli

  • High in vitamin C, A and B, as well as calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and other minerals. 
  • Rich in vitamin K which can help with bone density
  • High in fiber, zero fat, low calories
  • Serve raw or cooked in small amounts.
  • No added spices or seasonings (keep it simple and steam). Broccoli cooked with onions or garlic is to be strictly avoided (sorry, no leftover Chinese!)
  • Serving is one or two bite-sized florets
  • Preparation: Cut broccoli into small florets and wash thoroughly. Place in a steamer and follow the directions. Using a stove, put florets in an open vegetable steamer in a pot with boiling water and cover. Steam for about 6 to 8 minutes until crisp yet tender and bright green. You can also microwave them by putting 2 cups of broccoli florets in a microwave-safe container along with an inch of water for about 5 minutes.
  • Dog treat portion size: One or two bite-size florets
  • Benefits: Great source of vitamins C and K. Good source of vitamin A, folate and manganese. Broccoli is also high in fiber.

Brussels Sprouts

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients and minerals including C and K (good for immune system and bone density respectively)
  • Serve sprouts cooked and sliced with tough ends trimmed
  • No added spices or seasonings (steam or microwave till soft and easy to chew)
  • Brussel sprouts can make dogs gassy; serve in moderation until you observe tolerance to this food.
  • Serving is 1-3 sprouts depending on size of dog
  • Preparation: Choose Brussels sprouts that are green, feel firm and don’t smell too strong. Wash thoroughly and cut off the stems, leaving enough stem that the leaves are still intact. Some chefs advise cutting a little X to in the stem to help the core to cook. You can then microwave the sprouts with water for up to 8 minutes, steam them for 5 minutes or boil the sprouts for up to 10 minutes—a little less for more crunchiness.
  • Dog treat portion size: 1/2 to 2 sprouts, depending upon the dog’s size
  • Benefits: Great source of vitamins K and C. Good source of manganese, folate, fiber, potassium and vitamins A, B1 and B6.

Carrots

  • Crunchy and sweet, most dogs love carrots
  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients and minerals
  • If buying organic carrots peeling is not necessary; conventionally grown carrots should be peeled
  • Can be eaten raw or cooked. Can be a choking hazard; cut into bite-sized pieces
  • Grated carrots are an excellent nutrition-rich topper for prepared dog foods
  • Serving is one or two bite-sized pieces or 1/4 cup grated
  • Preparation: Remove ends and thoroughly wash. Cut into bite-size treats and cook in a pot of boiling water for about 10 minutes or steam for two to six minutes until tender. Alternately, serve raw.
  • Dog treat portion size: One or two bite-size pieces
  • Benefits: Carrots contain beta carotene, which is converted into vitamin A. They are also a good source of vitamins K and C, fiber and potassium.

Cauliflower

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients and minerals
  • High in fiber, zero fat, low calories
  • Can make dogs gassy; serve in moderation until you observe tolerance to this food.
  • No added spices or seasonings (keep it simple and steam or grill). Cauliflower cooked with onions or garlic is to be strictly avoided
  • Serving is one or two florets or 1/4 cup mashed or pureed

  • Preparation: Wash thoroughly. To grill the cauliflower, leave a little stalk intact. Marinate the cauliflower for 30 minutes in olive oil and then grill for 5 to 6 minutes on each side until crisp yet tender.
  • Dog treat portion size: 1 to 2 florets, depending on the dog’s size
  • Benefits: This vegetable that's good for dogs is a great source of vitamin C. It's also a good source of vitamins K and B6, folate and choline.

Celery

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients and minerals
  • High in fiber, zero fat, low in calories (about 6 calories in a single stalk)
  • May help to freshen breath!
  • Can be served cooked, raw or even juiced and poured over prepared dog food as a treat
  • Can cause digestive upset; start with a small serving and observe tolerance to this food
  • Serving is one or two bit sized pieces
  • Preparation: Wash thoroughly and serve raw. While your pup may enjoy the crunch, be sure to cut the veggie into bite-sized bits first, so they don't become a choking hazard.
  • Dog treat portion size: One or two bite-size pieces
  • Benefits: Containing vitamins A, B and C, this vegetable for dogs is nutrient-dense and low-calorie. It’s also water-dense, which means it’s a hydrating treat.

Cucumber

  • Rich in vitamin C, essential nutrients and some minerals
  • High water content makes them excellent for hydration
  • Zero fat, low in calories, low in sodium
  • Best served peeled with seeds removed
  • Serving is small round or single spear depending on size of dog

  • Preparation: Wash thoroughly, peel, cut in half and remove seeds. Cut into bite-size pieces. Cucumbers are best served raw, but can be cooked by placing pieces into pot with boiling water for about 5 minutes. Empty pot into strainer.
  • Dog treat portion size: One to two bite-size pieces
  • Benefits: This hydrating vegetable dogs can eat is a good source of vitamin K.

Edamame

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients, and minerals
  • High in fiber, zero fat, low in calories
  • Do not serve tough outer shell; Remove beans from shells
  • No added spices or seasoning; steam or microwave until soft
  • Serving is one to five beans depending on size of dog

  • Preparation: Edamame is conveniently available as a frozen vegetable in your local food store. Steam this veggie that's safe for dogs according to the directions on the bag.
  • Dog treat portion size: One to five unsalted, out-of-shell beans. Note: Always watch your dog eat small food items as they could choke on them in their excitement to gobble them down.
  • Benefits: Great source of protein, iron, fiber, vitamin K, Omega-3 fats, phosphorus, vitamin B2, potassium, copper and magnesium.

Green Beans

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients, protein and minerals
  • High in fiber, zero fat, low in calories
  • Serve cooked or raw
  • No added spices or seasonings; Frozen or even canned is fine as long as there is no added salt, onions or garlic
  • Serving is one or two pieces or 1/4-cup pureed and poured over prepared dog food

  • Preparation: Wash thoroughly and cut off ends. Use a covered pot to cook green beans in boiling water for about 10 minutes. Serve when cool. You can also cook green beans, brown rice and chicken in chicken broth to serve dogs with an upset tummy.
  • Dog treat portion size: One to two bite-size pieces
  • Benefits: A yummy vegetable dogs can eat, green beans are a great source of vitamins C, K and A, manganese and fiber.

Peas

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients and minerals
  • Good source of protein and fiber; zero fat, low in calories
  • Don’t feed peas to dogs with kidney issues
  • No added spices or seasonings; Frozen or canned are fine as long as there is no added salt, butter, onions or garlic
  • Serving is one or two peas (whole) or one tablespoon shelled

  • Preparation: Fresh peas are usually available as snow, sugar snap or English peas. English peas must be shelled. Snow and sugar snap peas’ shells are edible. You can grill sugar snap and snow peas for about 3 minutes on each side, first lightly coating with olive oil if you prefer. For English peas, you need to shell them first. Cook the peas (minus their pods) in boiling water only two to four minutes until they turn bright green. Drain in a colander.
  • Dog treat portion size: One or two Sugar snap or snow peas. For English, 1 or 2 tablespoons – depending on the dog’s size
  • Benefits: Great source of vitamin K, and C. Good source of manganese, fiber, folate, phosphorus, protein, magnesium, copper, iron, zinc, potassium and vitamins B1, A, B6, B3 and B2.

Potatoes

  • High in vitamins and minerals
  • Never feed your dog raw potatoes as they contain solanine which is toxic to dogs
  • Potatoes should be peeled and well cooked
  • Sorry, French fries, potato chips and mashed with butter or gravy are off the menu
  • Serving is one or two wedges or about 1/4 cup mashed

  • Preparation: Wash thoroughly and steam or boil then mash or cut into wedges and bake in the oven at 325-degrees on parchment paper with no added oil or salt
  • Dog treat portion size: One or two wedges, depending on dog’s size
  • Benefits: Good source of vitamins C and B6, potassium, manganese and fiber.

Sweet Potato

  • High in vitamins, essential nutrients and minerals
  • High in fiber, low in fat, excellent for constipation
  • Higher in calories than other vegetables so watch portion size
  • Serving is a few tablespoons mashed or a small chew

  • Preparation: Sweet potatoes make a great chew if you dehydrate them. Cut them lengthwise, 1/4-inch thick. Just follow the vegetable dehydration instructions included with your dehydrator. You can also feed your dog mashed sweet potatoes. To prepare, peel and wash potatoes. Cut into quarters. Put into boiling water in a large pot and simmer for about 20 minutes. Test potatoes with a fork. When they are fully tender, remove from pot, place in a heat-resistant container and mash with a potato masher.
  • Dog treat portion size: Half or one dehydrated chew, depending on size of dog. Mix 1 to 2 tablespoons of mashed sweet potato in dog’s dry dog food.
  • Benefits: Great source of vitamin A. Good source of vitamins C, B6 and B5, manganese, potassium and fiber.

Zucchini

  • High in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants
  • Low in calories and cholesterol
  • Can be served cooked or raw; do not add spices, or seasonings such as salt
  • Can make dogs gassy; serve in moderation until you observe tolerance to this food
  • Serving is one or two wedges or a tablespoon added to prepared dog food

  • Preparation:  Shred it or cut it into small pieces and feed raw, or you can boil and mash this good veggie for dogs and mix it in with either wet or dry dog food.
  • Dog treat portion size: One or two wedges or slices, or 1 to 2 tablespoons mixed in with dog food.
  • Benefits: Zucchini contains lots of vitamin C, an antioxidant, and potassium, which aids in muscle and nerve health.

Vegetables Dogs Shouldn't Eat

Remember, there are some vegetables you should not feed to your dog, as they are toxic to dogs and can result in harmful effects. Never offer your dog the following toxic vegetables:

  • Onions
  • Rhubarb
  • Avocado
  • Wild mushrooms
  • Garlic
  • Unripe tomatoes and tomato plants

As a rule of thumb, always get the OK from your veterinarian before feeding your pet a new food. Even some otherwise good veggies for dogs might not be ideal for pets with certain underlying medical conditions or special dietary needs. Watch out for any adverse reactions, such as nausea or loose stools. Sometimes certain safe veggies for dogs, like Brussel sprouts, will cause gas in dogs, so don’t overdo the amount you give them.

If you are giving your pup a dog-friendly vegetable for the first time, offer just one small piece and watch them for any adverse reactions such as vomiting, diarrhea or gas before increasing the size or amount.


Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What vegetables are toxic for dogs?

A: As explained above, there are several veggies that are toxic to dogs. These include onions, rhubarb, avocado, mushrooms, garlic, and unripe tomatoes and tomato plants. Be sure that these and other dangerous foods and items for dogs are always out of reach of your pooch.

Q: What vegetables are good for dogs with sensitive stomachs?

A: All pet parents should talk to their vet before giving their dog a new food—but especially if their dog has a sensitive stomach. With your vet's OK, consider peeled and mashed sweet potatoes, which are yummy and typically gentler on tummies.

Q: What are the best vegetables for puppies?

A: Puppies have sensitive tummies and very specific nutritional needs, so give your vet a call before giving them a new food—veggies included! With their OK, try very small (puppy-sized!) bits of carrots and green beans. Avoid highly fibrous vegetables like broccoli.

Q: Can dogs eat the skin of vegetables?

A: Dogs can consume the skin of many vegetables. Follow the preparation instructions above to best ensure your dog's safety.


Now that you know what vegetables dogs can eat, take an extra trip down that produce aisle and consider adding one or two to their diet. You’ll be glad your pup is getting some additional nutrients—and they’ll love the extra treat!

There are no “stupid” questions when it comes to your pet’s health. If you suspect your pet is sick, please call your vet immediately. For diet, wellness and health-related questions, always consult your regular veterinarian when possible as they can make the best recommendations for your pet. (If you need help finding a vet near you use this link.) The content on this blog is provided for informational use only and does not constitute professional veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment.


Reporting provided by writers/editors Wendy Rose Gould and Melissa Kauffman. Content reviewed by Dr. Sarah Wooten, DVM. A Colorado-based veterinarian, Dr. Sarah Wooten is a graduate of UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and a member of the American Society of Veterinary Journalists. She has over a decade of experience in small animal general practice.

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By: Chewy EditorialUpdated:

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