Tibetan Mastiff vs Saint Bernard

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
10 to 12 years
Size:

Extra Large

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Medium

Best For

Tibetan Mastiffs are best for experienced dog parents and families with older children or teens with the time and energy to train these massive pups.

Tibetan Mastiff Temperament

Tibetan Mastiffs are independent introverts who tend to be wary of strangers but are loving and loyal to their people. Though personality can vary from one dog to the next, these dogs tend to be headstrong guardians who often think they know what’s best and view themselves more as...

Tibetan Mastiffs are independent introverts who tend to be wary of strangers but are loving and loyal to their people. Though personality can vary from one dog to the next, these dogs tend to be headstrong guardians who often think they know what’s best and view themselves more as equal partners than pets.

Without proper socialization from the time they’re a puppy, a Tibetan Mastiff will become aggressive toward strangers and other dogs. But with plenty of exposure to different people, pets and situations throughout their lives, they’ll be more accepting, though still aloof and standoffish, reserving their affection for loved ones and their aggression for predators.

Pet parents need to be diligent about working with their pup to prevent biting tendencies brought on by resource guarding, territoriality or overprotectiveness. They have a bite force of 500 pounds, stronger than that of an American Pit Bull Terrier or German Shepherd, so even a playful bite could do major damage.

Tibetan Mastiff puppies can be taught to get along well with children and other pets when raised with them, but as adults, they may be less accepting of new dogs or other people’s children, so you probably won’t be able to entertain a lot of house guests with one of these dogs around. And their sheer size and strength make it risky to allow even well-socialized Tibetans to be around young children, cats or small dogs.

Their bossy natures make them a bad fit for obedience competitions, and they’re not built for agility or speed. But give these dogs some sheep, goats or cattle to guard, and watch them excel. Guarding livestock is hardwired into their DNA, and they’re at their best and happiest when they’re allowed to be watchful protectors over their domain.

Tibetan Mastiff Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
8 to 10 years
Size:

Extra Large

Maintenance Level:

High

Shed Level:

High

Best For

Saint Bernards are best for larger homes with experienced pet parents. These gentle giants are kid- and pet-friendly but need a lot of focused training, nutrition and exercise in their first year.

Saint Bernard Temperament

Would you ever expect your personal bodyguard to be mistaken for a floofy teddy bear? Probably not, but you should. (Because: Safety first. And also because: Adorable.) Saint Bernards’ protective personalities and gentle, calm demeanor with a dash of playfulness are a natural fit for homes with older children, oth...

Would you ever expect your personal bodyguard to be mistaken for a floofy teddy bear? Probably not, but you should. (Because: Safety first. And also because: Adorable.) Saint Bernards’ protective personalities and gentle, calm demeanor with a dash of playfulness are a natural fit for homes with older children, other dogs and even friendly felines. They’ll also mesh with younger children, but littler kiddos will need extra supervision to ensure they can respect your pup’s boundaries.

A Saint Bernard dog doesn’t always comprehend just how big they are, which can cause some consternation and tears when playing with tipsy tots or unstable adults (or tipsy adults, for that matter). Training for both humans and the dog is a must to be sure nobody accidentally gets knocked over during backyard romps or in-home zoomies. Saints are friendly dogs (and they swear they didn’t mean to knock you down! They thought you were trying to start a game of tag!) and will stay that way with a loving home and positive reinforcement-based training. In general, Saints are not known to bite, but there have been reports of aggression in their senior years due to neurological conditions. Proper socialization for your Saint Bernard puppy before 20 to 24 weeks of age allows your outgoing pup to learn good manners and blossom as a beloved family pet.

If it looks like you’re going to do something fun, Saints will want to join you, no questions asked. They’re in the car before you can even find your keys, ready for a nature trail adventure or a Sunday drive through the country. Whatever their human is doing, they want to mirror the activity or supervise from a cozy spot next to your feet.

If you have a job you need doing, give it to a Saint, and they will be more than happy to check it off your To Do list. Saint Bernards are a working breed who love to help people. Give them a chore, like helping feed livestock on a farm or serving as a door greeter at your small business, and they’ll be happy campers. Saints are eager to please. You’ll know the Saint Bernard is in their element when they can’t stop the drool from flowing and their tail from wagging.

Saint Bernard Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents
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