Saint Bernard vs Newfoundland

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
8 to 10 years
Size:

Extra Large

Maintenance Level:

High

Shed Level:

High

Best For

Saint Bernards are best for larger homes with experienced pet parents. These gentle giants are kid- and pet-friendly but need a lot of focused training, nutrition and exercise in their first year.

Saint Bernard Temperament

Would you ever expect your personal bodyguard to be mistaken for a floofy teddy bear? Probably not, but you should. (Because: Safety first. And also because: Adorable.) Saint Bernards’ protective personalities and gentle, calm demeanor with a dash of playfulness are a natural fit for homes with older children, oth...

Would you ever expect your personal bodyguard to be mistaken for a floofy teddy bear? Probably not, but you should. (Because: Safety first. And also because: Adorable.) Saint Bernards’ protective personalities and gentle, calm demeanor with a dash of playfulness are a natural fit for homes with older children, other dogs and even friendly felines. They’ll also mesh with younger children, but littler kiddos will need extra supervision to ensure they can respect your pup’s boundaries.

A Saint Bernard dog doesn’t always comprehend just how big they are, which can cause some consternation and tears when playing with tipsy tots or unstable adults (or tipsy adults, for that matter). Training for both humans and the dog is a must to be sure nobody accidentally gets knocked over during backyard romps or in-home zoomies. Saints are friendly dogs (and they swear they didn’t mean to knock you down! They thought you were trying to start a game of tag!) and will stay that way with a loving home and positive reinforcement-based training. In general, Saints are not known to bite, but there have been reports of aggression in their senior years due to neurological conditions. Proper socialization for your Saint Bernard puppy before 20 to 24 weeks of age allows your outgoing pup to learn good manners and blossom as a beloved family pet.

If it looks like you’re going to do something fun, Saints will want to join you, no questions asked. They’re in the car before you can even find your keys, ready for a nature trail adventure or a Sunday drive through the country. Whatever their human is doing, they want to mirror the activity or supervise from a cozy spot next to your feet.

If you have a job you need doing, give it to a Saint, and they will be more than happy to check it off your To Do list. Saint Bernards are a working breed who love to help people. Give them a chore, like helping feed livestock on a farm or serving as a door greeter at your small business, and they’ll be happy campers. Saints are eager to please. You’ll know the Saint Bernard is in their element when they can’t stop the drool from flowing and their tail from wagging.

Saint Bernard Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
9 to 10 years
Size:

Extra Large

Maintenance Level:

High

Shed Level:

Very High

Best For

Newfoundlands are best for pet parents with some previous dog experience. They're happy with both singles and families with children, and because these pups are giant-sized, a home with lots of space is needed.

Newfoundland Temperament

Newfoundlands are known for having a patient and gentle personality. They love being around their people and are naturally friendly with strangers. Just like any other breed, they need early socialization (aka exposure to new people, places and things) to understand how to play appropriately with other dogs; sometimes the...

Newfoundlands are known for having a patient and gentle personality. They love being around their people and are naturally friendly with strangers. Just like any other breed, they need early socialization (aka exposure to new people, places and things) to understand how to play appropriately with other dogs; sometimes the goofy Newfie doesn’t realize how big they are! But consistent training will help your Newfoundland puppy grow up to be a confident, well-mannered dog.

The sweet-tempered Newfoundland makes a great family dog, as they typically get along well with kids of all ages, including babies and toddlers. While it may be cute, make sure your child doesn’t sit or ride on your Newfie. The dog may tolerate it, but as they get older, health problems like hip dysplasia can make them uncomfortable. This breed isn’t known for having aggressive tendencies, so pain is about the only reason a Newfoundland would growl or bite (outside of typical puppy behavior).

While the Newfoundland breed is often treated as family (especially in the United States), they are still used as working dogs in their home provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. Originally bred for their skill at water rescues and to haul in fishing nets, today, the dogs are used for pulling carts or as pack horses. (And you may find they enjoy participating in “working” dog sports like carting and drafting competitions.)

Newfoundland Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents
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