Rottweiler vs Cane Corso

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
9 to 10 years
Size:

Large

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Medium

Best For

The Rottweiler is best for active homes without small children or cats and an experienced pet parent.

Rottweiler Temperament

A well-trained Rottweiler dog is calm and confident. Unlike a Golden Retriever who readily welcomes guests to your home, a Rottweiler may hang back and assess the situation, not ready to make a friend. To their family, they are ready to play and ready to protect in a split sec...

A well-trained Rottweiler dog is calm and confident. Unlike a Golden Retriever who readily welcomes guests to your home, a Rottweiler may hang back and assess the situation, not ready to make a friend. To their family, they are ready to play and ready to protect in a split second. Despite their size, your Rottweiler may think they’re a lap dog and squeeze as much of themselves onto your lap as possible.

This highly intelligent and protective dog needs a confident, experienced family. Rottweilers were bred to be guard dogs, and they are really good at it. They have a deep growl they use to alert their families to a potential threat, but they have an equally famous “rumble” sound they make when they are happy and content. (It frequently accompanies a belly rub.) Because of their protective nature, Rottweilers have high biting tendencies. So, it is important your Rottweiler starts their training as a puppy.

Rottweilers do best in homes where they are the only pet, as they tend to make their BFF their family instead of another dog or a cat. If your Rottie is properly socialized and well-trained, they can be a good dog for your family.

Rottweiler Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
9 to 12 years
Size:

Extra Large

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Low

Best For

The Cane Corso is best for experienced pet parents with lots of space, time to commit to training and exercise, and no young children or small pets.

Cane Corso Temperament

You’ll never get bored with a Cane Corso around—you simply won’t have time for it. The training, socialization and exercise needs of this breed will keep you busy throughout their whole life. This is a working breed who was bred to be a guard dog. With mem...

You’ll never get bored with a Cane Corso around—you simply won’t have time for it. The training, socialization and exercise needs of this breed will keep you busy throughout their whole life. This is a working breed who was bred to be a guard dog. With members of their own household, Corsos can be affectionate companions, but that’s about as far as the Cane Corso’s friendliness goes. These are sensitive, serious and intensely loyal dogs. They’re naturally alert to new people coming to the house and may show aggression toward strangers—both two- and four-legged—if not properly trained and socialized.

Properly trained and socialized Cane Corsos will be calm and confident. They should ignore strangers and animals who pose no threat to themselves or their people, saving their aggression for legit threats. Thankfully, their high intelligence makes it easy to teach them the difference.

Cane Corso Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents
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