Puli vs Komondor

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
10 to 15 years
Size:

Medium

Maintenance Level:

High

Shed Level:

Low

Best For

The Puli is a high-energy breed who thrives with an active and experienced pet parent. They do well with kids and cats if raised together from puppyhood, and they are great companions for other dogs...

The Puli is a high-energy breed who thrives with an active and experienced pet parent. They do well with kids and cats if raised together from puppyhood, and they are great companions for other dogs in the home. If you or one of your family members has dog allergies, this breed might be for you—they're considered hypoallergenic.

Puli Temperament

Just like you, the Puli is one of a kind. With their unmistakable long cords (which people sometimes mistake for dreadlocks), a fun-loving but sometimes ornery attitude and eager-to-please personality, Pulik (or Pulis, both are the plural of Puli) are loyal dogs who live for fun with their favorite hum...

Just like you, the Puli is one of a kind. With their unmistakable long cords (which people sometimes mistake for dreadlocks), a fun-loving but sometimes ornery attitude and eager-to-please personality, Pulik (or Pulis, both are the plural of Puli) are loyal dogs who live for fun with their favorite human (that’s you!).

The Puli breed has their roots in Hungarian sheepherding, and today, the herding instinct remains strong. That means early socialization and basic obedience training (skills like sit, stay and come) are essential to raising a confident adult Puli dog. This intelligent breed loves using their brains, so they’re happy to learn advanced skills, too.

Though strong-willed thanks to their being bred to work independently, Pulis are dedicated to their family. They are naturally protective, making them good guarding dogs, and can be wary of strangers, though they generally get along well with people (once they get to know them) and other dogs. The downside to having the long corded fur is that when it covers their eyes and disguises the tail and ears of the Puli, it can be difficult for other dogs to read their body language—the primary way dogs communicate. If only dogs could pass notes to each other. (“I like you, do you like me? Check a box: Yes or No.”)

A Puli dog can live with a cat, but it helps if they grow up together and pet parents put boundaries in place to prevent the dog from giving into their herding instincts and chasing the cat. Same with young children—your Puli may try to keep your children from straying too far away or wandering around the house, but some training can help with that.

Pulik need a good amount of both mental and physical stimulation—no couch potatoes allowed, and don’t be stingy with the walks, either! Long walks, puzzle toys in the house or an agility or herding dog class will keep your Puli satisfied, and help them put their best paw forward on a daily basis.

Puli Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
10 to 12 years
Size:

Large

Maintenance Level:

High

Shed Level:

Low

Best For

Komondorok (plural of Komondor) are best for large homes and experienced pet parents. With proper socialization and supervision, they can be good with older kids and even cats, but beware that chaos might ensue around...

Komondorok (plural of Komondor) are best for large homes and experienced pet parents. With proper socialization and supervision, they can be good with older kids and even cats, but beware that chaos might ensue around other dogs and strangers.

Komondor Temperament

Komondor dogs generally have a calm and quiet temperament, but they will react when they sense strange things are afoot, and that’s usually in the form of a deep bark that’s also pretty loud. Bred in Hungary as a flock guardian, they are devoted to their family, fie...

Komondor dogs generally have a calm and quiet temperament, but they will react when they sense strange things are afoot, and that’s usually in the form of a deep bark that’s also pretty loud. Bred in Hungary as a flock guardian, they are devoted to their family, fiercely protective, and very wary of strangers.

All of these traits are fine when taken separately, but when they come together, that can result in undesirable behaviors if the dog has not been properly trained and socialized. It’s important to remember that, out in the fields, these dogs were largely left to their own devices when herding sheep. Over time, the Komondor breed developed a strong sense of independence.

When properly socialized, Komondorok can do well with kids and other pets. Although, they can be aggressive toward dogs they don’t know, so trips to the dog parks may not be a good idea. (Learn more about training and socialization below in the Training.)

Like most working dogs, Komondorok always need something constructive to do. Without daily exercise or mental stimulation to keep them occupied, you may not be happy with the outcome as these large dogs can be extremely destructive when bored.

Komondor Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents
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