Basset Hound vs Bloodhound

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
12 to 13 years
Size:

Medium

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Medium

Best For

Basset Hounds are best for more relaxed families with kids or pet siblings, in homes without thin walls, close neighbors or a lot of stairs.

Basset Hound Temperament

Basset Hounds have a laid-back personality and are calm under pressure. Their good-natured demeanor is accepting of outsiders, but don’t expect these low-key dogs to get all wiggly and excited about it. When it comes to their families, they’re very devoted and are amazing with siblings, whether kid...

Basset Hounds have a laid-back personality and are calm under pressure. Their good-natured demeanor is accepting of outsiders, but don’t expect these low-key dogs to get all wiggly and excited about it. When it comes to their families, they’re very devoted and are amazing with siblings, whether kids, cats or other dogs. They don’t like to be alone for long, so don’t be surprised if they seek you out for couch cuddles. They’ll happily be your binge-watching buddy.

But don’t be too fooled by their Zen-like nature—their low energy level kicks into high gear whenever they catch an interesting scent, whether it belongs to food or another critter. (And when this scenting hound does get excited, it’s usually accompanied by their distinctive baying bark.) That’s because Basset Hounds were bred to hunt with their noses, and this instinct sometimes gets them into trouble. They may choose to ignore you and wander away on the trail of a scent if they’re allowed off-leash. Tracking sports and other scent-based games can be a healthy outlet for their powerful sniffers.

And don’t assume their chill personality means they’ll be easy to train. Like all hounds, the Basset Hound’s independence can make them appear stubborn and slow on the uptake. They’re not naturally people-pleasers, so they need a confident pup parent to train them. These dogs actually possess a lot of intelligence—they just need a little more patience when it comes to training. Lots of rewards with a favorite treat will help make you more interesting than the smells around them and help shape them into loving, loyal and well-mannered BFFs.

Basset Hound Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
10 to 12 years
Size:

Large

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Medium

Best For

Bloodhounds are best for high-energy pup parents with other pets (the more, the merrier!) who live in homes with fenced-in yards.

Bloodhound Temperament

“A nose with a dog attached” is a common way to describe a Bloodhound. Their sense of smell is extraordinary, and their nose is what they use to navigate the world around them. This trait can’t be trained out of them; your Bloodhound has access to an entire wor...

“A nose with a dog attached” is a common way to describe a Bloodhound. Their sense of smell is extraordinary, and their nose is what they use to navigate the world around them. This trait can’t be trained out of them; your Bloodhound has access to an entire world that you can’t see (or smell), and they will go where their nose takes them.

When not in hot pursuit of a scent, the Bloodhound breed can be laid-back members of the family. But just like people, their personalities can differ: Some are so high-energy that they’re seemingly always on the move, and others are happy to spend their downtime curled up on the rug. You can help them expend their energy by letting them romp by themselves in the backyard (as long as the yard is fenced). They’re also eager to go on hikes or walks with you. Just remember, when they catch a scent, nothing stands in their way—and they are off! (They look like they’re at Mach speed when they go.) For this reason, make sure any dog walker (professional or pint size) has a firm grasp on the leash!

With their sturdy size and high energy levels, they may accidentally mow down toddlers, but their temperament is very low-key. While they get along great with other animals and people, they may sometimes be shy, so it’s a good idea to start socializing your Bloodhound puppy while they’re young.

A Bloodhound can be slower to mature than other breeds. This isn’t code for “unintelligent,” but it does mean that housebreaking and commands (like sit, stay and come) may take more time for them than other pups. Be consistent and kind and make sure everyone is on the same page when it comes to rules of the house—inconsistency will confuse a Bloodhound, and they may decide to make up their own rules instead. Bloodhounds do best when they know exactly what to expect from the people in their family.

Bloodhound Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents
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