Airedale Terrier vs Welsh Terrier

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
11 to 14 years
Size:

Medium

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Low

Best For

Airedale Terriers are best for active and experienced pet parents who can invest time in training so their pet doesn't become the boss of them. When properly socialized, they do well with children and some...

Airedale Terriers are best for active and experienced pet parents who can invest time in training so their pet doesn't become the boss of them. When properly socialized, they do well with children and some dogs, but most don't mix well with cats.

Airedale Terrier Temperament

Airedale Terriers are the largest of the terrier breeds, so you might assume they have an extra-high dose of terrier spirit—fiesty, independent, athletic and talkative. But even though they are high energy, they’re actually a little less “terrier-ish” than some of the smaller terrier types. Airedales are sup...

Airedale Terriers are the largest of the terrier breeds, so you might assume they have an extra-high dose of terrier spirit—fiesty, independent, athletic and talkative. But even though they are high energy, they’re actually a little less “terrier-ish” than some of the smaller terrier types. Airedales are super intelligent and, thanks to this, they excel in whatever they put their mind to.

Most Airedales love family life and accept children when properly introduced and socialized, although their patience levels may not be as saint-like as, say, a Golden Retriever. They tend to be good around dogs they know, but they are sometimes wary around dogs they don’t know. And with the Airedale Terrier breed’s innate hunting instincts, it’ll be tricky to have a cat in the household. They are good guard dogs, although not overly aggressive, and they have an average bite force. (So, be sure to work with your puppy to help them learn it’s not OK to nip.)

“But wait!” adds the Airedale, “Tell them how talented I am!” Throughout their history, Airedales have achieved an impressive resume of work as military and police dogs. It’s been said they can do anything, and that includes agility, dock diving, hunting, flyball, tracking, scent work, search and rescue, obedience and therapy work. (Whew!)

Airedale Terrier Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents

Breed Snapshot

Life Expectancy:
12 to 15 years
Size:

Small

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Shed Level:

Very Low

Best For

The Welsh Terrier, or Welshie, is best suited to experienced pet parents who understand the value of training and, of course, have the time to invest in it. This breed thrives in an active household...

The Welsh Terrier, or Welshie, is best suited to experienced pet parents who understand the value of training and, of course, have the time to invest in it. This breed thrives in an active household and needs a home with plenty of backyard space to contain their antics. While friendly and devoted, the Welsh Terrier is better in the company of kids older than 6 who know when to give space to this feisty little ball of energy.

Welsh Terrier Temperament

The Welsh Terrier dog breed is affectionate with the people they love. They’re outgoing, spirited and highly alert. No wallflowers here! On the flip side, they’ll likely chase and bark after any little critter that moves. Welshies are not naturally aggressive, nor do they have strong bit...

The Welsh Terrier dog breed is affectionate with the people they love. They’re outgoing, spirited and highly alert. No wallflowers here! On the flip side, they’ll likely chase and bark after any little critter that moves.

Welshies are not naturally aggressive, nor do they have strong biting tendencies, but as a hunting breed, untrained dogs (and sometimes even the trained ones) will chase after small animals, including cats, and fight back if challenged by other dogs. Pro tip: If buying or adopting two dogs at once, try to get one of each gender for a smoother transition.

A Welsh Terrier’s fun-loving temperament can make them great pets who can co-exist beautifully with active parents. Raising a Welshie with kids is more of a mixed bag. The best chance for happy cohabitation depends on the young children’s age at the time the dog enters the home (older than 6 is your best bet), and whether there’s diligent supervision and socialization.

A medium- or large-sized home with plenty of indoor and outdoor space—a big fenced yard, for example—to speed around in is ideal. They definitely need room to get the zoomies out. Some say that small apartment living is fine too, but due to their high energy and natural hunting tendencies, Welshies tend to jump on furniture to make room for play and should always be on a leash when out in public.

Welsh Terriers are bred to hunt vermin, so once they’ve caught a whiff of an unfamiliar or desirable scent, they will fearlessly go after what they want. If that’s a treat or toy, yay, everybody’s happy! If it’s the unsuspecting family cat, yeah, not so much.

This breed isn’t the best choice for first-time dog parents as Welsh Terriers’ intelligence and high energy levels demand above-average physical exercise as well as a ton of training and mental stimulation for them to thrive. Regardless, if a Welsh Terrier puppy has already won your heart, make sure they come from a reputable breeder and invest in a certified trainer to end up with the best Welsh Terrier qualities and a devoted forever friend.

Welsh Terrier Traits

Friendliness
Exercise Needs
Health Issues
Barking Tendencies
Grooming Needs
Shedding Level
Training Needs
Good With Kids
Good With Cats
Good As A Service Dog
Good For Apartments & Small Homes
Biting Tendencies
Energy Level
Good With Other Dogs
Playfulness
Sensitive to Cold Weather
Sensitive to Warm Weather
Good For First Time Pet Parents
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